• Rheumatology

Rheumatology

Summary

Paediatric and adult medicine rheumatologists are specialist physicians with particular expertise in the diagnosis and holistic management of people with diseases that affect joints, muscles and bones.

specialty image
36–40 hours/week
average time worked
$169,409/year
average salary
3 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Rheumatology
The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) – Adult Medicine (AM) and Paediatrics and Child Health (PCH)
   
Paediatric and adult medicine rheumatologists are specialist physicians with particular expertise in the diagnosis and holistic management of people with diseases that affect joints, muscles and bones.
https://www.racp.edu.au/trainees/advanced-training/advanced-training-programs/rheumatology
$3,426
36–40
69/31
13
3
Oversubscribed
48
No
N/A
Entry requirements for Advanced Training in rheumatology through RACP:
- Completion of RACP Basic Physician Training, including the RACP Written and Clinical Examinations
- Current Medical registration
- Appointment to an appropriate Advanced Training position
Entry requirements for RACP Basic Training:
- Complete a medical degree accredited by the Australian Medical Council (AMC) or Medical Council of New Zealand (MCNZ);
- Have a general medical registration with the Medical Board of Australia, or a medical registration with a general scope of practice with the MCNZ if applying in New Zealand;
- Have satisfactorily completed at least one intern year (post graduate year one); Be employed by an accredited training hospital or health services (where you will do your Basic Training);
- Discuss your application and receive approval to apply for Basic Training from the hospital (or network) Director of Physician Education (DPE)*. Approval of the DPE is subject to selection processes, training capacity and/or performance of the prospective trainee.

For more details visit: college website.
Applications are made online via the college:
https://www.racp.edu.au/trainees/advanced-training/apply-to-start-advanced-training/
$169,409
Basic training written exam: $1,820
Basic training clinical exam: $2,723

Advanced training For more information visit https://www.racp.edu.au/become-a-physician/membership-fees
$4,543 basic training + advanced training (enquire with RACP)
Time-based requirements - Training time and rotations
Purpose:To ensure adequate time for trainees to gain necessary learning experiences across a range of relevant rotations.
Total training time: 3 years (36 months (FTE))
Training rotations:
- 24 months core training
- 12 months non-core training

Core training

A minimum of 24 months (FTE) must be spent in accredited clinical training positions. The two years of core training must be completed at separate sites and should precede non-core training (see note below).

Non-core training A maximum of 12 months of non-core training may be undertaken in clinical training in other disciplines, or in research. The following guidelines have been developed to help trainees formulate their non-core training year.
The non-core year can take a number of forms:
1. A rheumatology clinical year, in either:
- a site accredited for core rheumatology training
or - a site accredited for non-core rheumatology clinical training.
2. Advance notice to the overseeing committee is not required if the non-core year is to be a clinical year in a site with current accreditation for core or non-core rheumatology training.
3. A clinical research year in which the trainee is involved in a major clinical research project, either of their own development or as a contributor to an ongoing research project. Publication in a peer-reviewed journal is expected. The trainee will be expected to participate in a minimum of one general rheumatology clinic per week in addition to the research clinical work.
4. A research year relevant to the specialty of rheumatology, with enrolment in a senior degree program such as, but not exclusive to, PhD, MD (research) or an MPH. This must be full-time, and attendance to one general rheumatology clinic per week is encouraged.
5. Other training in a field related to rheumatology. This may include, but is not limited to, such disciplines as general medicine, general paediatrics, ultrasonography, etc.


For options 3, 4 or 5, a detailed letter should be submitted to the relevant overseeing committee by 31 August. The letter should outline the trainee’s experience to date, their aims for the non-core year, and how this may contribute to a continuing career in rheumatology. Depending on whether the year is clinical or in research, details such as numbers and types of clinics per week, evidence of course acceptance, program hours, and subjects in a course may be relevant.

NB:
- Dual trainees applying for non-core training before core training will have their non-core training prospectively approved (provided it meets the guidelines above) but certification will be deferred until completion of a minimum of 12 months of core training.
- For all other trainees it is expected that the non-core year will follow core training. Application to (and approval by) the relevant overseeing committee outlining exceptional circumstances is required before the commencement of a non-core year out of the required sequence.
The NZ ATS will prospectively approve, on a case-by-case basis, only those rotations which are closely related to rheumatology.

Training time in Australia/New Zealand At least 12 months of Core Advanced Training in Rheumatology must be undertaken in Australia and/or New Zealand. This is to ensure that trainees receive adequate exposure to local practices and health services.
Applications to commence training close in January (or August for mid-year applications).
Advanced training

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