• Radiation oncology

Radiation oncology

Summary

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A radiation oncologist is a medical specialist who has specific postgraduate training in the management of patients with cancer, in particular involving the use of radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy) as one aspect of treatment.

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36–40 hours/week
average time worked
$153,795/year
average salary
5 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Radiation oncology
The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR)
   
A radiation oncologist is a medical specialist who has specific postgraduate training in the management of patients with cancer, in particular involving the use of radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy) as one aspect of treatment.
http://www.ranzcr.edu.au/training/radiation-oncology
$2,012
36–40
80/20
17
5
Oversubscribed
108
No
N/A
To be accepted into the college’s training program, a candidate must:

- Have appropriate basic medical qualifications:
- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by a medical board in Australia and the council of RANZCR (or have successfully completed both part I and part II AMC examinations for overseas medical graduates in Australia)
OR
- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by the Medical Council of New Zealand and the council of RANZCR (or have successfully completed the NZREX for overseas medical graduates in New Zealand)
OR
- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by the registering authority of the country in which the RANZCR training program is conducted and the council of RANZCR



- Be fully registered as a medical practitioner by the registering authority recognised by the council of RANZCR in the state or country in which the RANZCR training program is conducted

AND

- Have completed at least two full years in an approved hospital as an intern/resident.

As a general rule, the college encourages experience in a broad spectrum of clinical disciplines prior to undertaking radiation oncology training.
Applications are made online via the college: https://www.ranzcr.com/join-our-professions/rad-onc/a-career-in-radiation-oncology
46
$153,795
Phase 1: $2,760
The phase 1 examination is a written examination intended to assess your knowledge of the oncology sciences. The exam is usually undertaken in the second year of training.

The examination is comprised of two written papers (paper 1 and paper 2), each of which is to be completed in 2.5 hours. A candidate will sit both papers on the same day.

Phase 2: $3,760
The phase 2 examination in radiation oncology has two main components:
1. The written papers
There are four written papers:
- Radiation therapy 1: a 5-question paper to be completed in 2.5 hours.
- Radiation therapy 2: a 5-question paper to be completed in 2.5 hours.
- Clinical oncology: a 6-question paper to be completed in 3 hours.
- Pathology: a 6-question paper to be completed in 3 hours.

2. The viva voce examinations (clinical examinations or vivas)
The vivas include examinations in:
- Radiation therapy/clinical oncology (a planning exam and eight clinical cases). One of the clinical cases will be solely focused on physical examination of the patient.
- Pathology
$6,520
The current radiation oncology training program, is a five-year program conducted in two phases:
- Phase 1: 18–24 months duration
- Phase 2: approximately 36–42 months duration (depending on the trainee’s progress through Phase 1)
Application dates vary. Contact the college for specific dates.
2

NB: Salary figures, working hours, undersubscribed and oversubscribed can vary greatly depending on various factors including but not limited to geographic location, private or public practice. MedVersus provides an Australia wide overview. For information specific to your needs we encourage you to discuss further with the relevant colleges/associations. For feedback/information to keep the site up to date please contact us by email: media@gptq.qld.edu.au

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