• Clinical radiology

Clinical radiology

Summary

Radiologists are trained to assist other doctors and specialists to treat their patients by making a diagnosis and providing treatment using medical imaging.
Radiologists can choose to work in various sub-specialties of radiology such as breast imaging, interventional radiology, musculoskeletal imaging, cardiac imaging, or paediatric (children’s) imaging.
Most radiologists work in a public or private hospitals or private radiology practices. They are there to assist other doctors in diagnosing and treating illness. Radiologists communicate the results of diagnostic and interventional imaging through a written report sent to the referring doctor. Radiologists work as part of a clinical team so that they can participate actively in decision making about imaging tests.
There are three types of radiology – diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic (called radiation oncology):
Diagnostic:
Diagnostic imaging uses plain X-ray radiology, computerised tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine imaging techniques to obtain images that are interpreted to aid in the diagnosis of disease.
Interventional:
Interventional radiologists treat as well as diagnose disease using imaging equipment. Interventional radiologists may sub-specialise further so that they only treat abnormalities of the brain or spinal cord (neurointervention) or of the blood vessels elsewhere in the body (angiointervention). Interventional radiology is a minimally invasive procedure using X-ray, magnetic or ultrasound images to guide the procedure, usually done with tiny instruments and thin plastic tubes called catheters inserted through an artery or vein.
Radiation oncology:
Radiation oncology uses radiation to treat diseases such as cancer, using radiation therapy. These specialists are not called radiologists, but radiation oncologists, even though they belong to The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

specialty image
36–40 hours/week
average time worked
$68,926 - $513,168/year
average salary
54 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Clinical radiology
The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR)
   
Radiologists are trained to assist other doctors and specialists to treat their patients by making a diagnosis and providing treatment using medical imaging. Radiologists can choose to work in various sub-specialties of radiology such as breast imaging, interventional radiology, musculoskeletal imaging, cardiac imaging, or paediatric (children’s) imaging.
Most radiologists work in a public or private hospital or private radiology practices. They are there to assist other doctors in diagnosing and treating illness. Radiologists communicate the results of diagnostic and interventional imaging through a written report sent to the referring doctor. Radiologists work as part of a clinical team so that they can participate actively in decision making about imaging tests. There are three types of radiology – diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic (called radiation oncology):
Diagnostic:
Diagnostic imaging uses plain X-ray radiology, computerised tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine imaging techniques to obtain images that are interpreted to aid in the diagnosis of disease.
Interventional:
Interventional radiologists treat as well as diagnose disease using imaging equipment. Interventional radiologists may sub-specialise further so that they only treat abnormalities of the brain or spinal cord (neurointervention) or of the blood vessels elsewhere in the body (angiointervention). Interventional radiology is a minimally invasive procedures using X-ray, magnetic or ultrasound images to guide the procedures, usually done with tiny instruments and thin plastic tubes called catheters inserted through an artery or vein.
Radiation oncology:
Radiation oncology uses radiation to treat diseases such as cancer, using radiation therapy. These specialists are not called radiologists, but radiation oncologists, even though they belong to The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.
http://www.ranzcr.edu.au/radiology/training-in-radiology
$2,012 per training year
36–40
35/65
79
54
Undersubscribed
428
No
N/A
To be accepted by the college into the training program a candidate must:

- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by the Medical Board of Australia and the Board of RANZCR (or have successfully completed both Part I and Part II AMC examinations for overseas medical graduates in Australia)
or
- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by the Medical Council of New Zealand and the Board of RANZCR (or have successfully completed NZREX for overseas medical graduates in New Zealand)
or
- Be a graduate of a medical school recognised by the registering authority of the country in which the RANZCR training program is conducted and the Board of RANZCR
and
- Be fully registered as a medical practitioner by the registering authority recognised by the Board of RANZCR, in the state or country in which the RANZCR training program is conducted
and
- Complete two full years in an approved hospital as an intern/resident.

As a general rule, the Radiology Education and Training Committee encourages experience in a broad spectrum of clinical disciplines prior to undertaking radiology training.
To apply, you need to have general medical registration and have completed two years in an approved hospital as an intern/resident. The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) Education Board encourages you to have experience in a broad spectrum of clinical disciplines before undertaking radiology training. After beginning training, you need to submit a proposed course of practical work to the Chief Censor in Radiology for approval. At the same time, you need to apply for student membership of RANZCR.
Applicants need to apply online: http://www.ranzcr.edu.au/training/resources/current-trainees/resources-for-radiology-trainees/radiology-forms/
50
$68,926 - $513,168
Part I: $2,680
Part II: $3,650
$6,330
The current radiodiagnosis curriculum, introduced from 1 December 2009, is a five-year program conducted in two phases: 
Phase 1 – three years of general radiology training
Phase 2 – two years of system-focused (as distinguished from sub-specialty) rotations for advanced radiology training.
Application dates vary. Contact the college for specific dates.
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