• Chemical pathology

Chemical pathology

Summary

Chemical pathology is the branch of pathology which deals with the diagnosis and management of disease by use of chemicals present in body fluids and tissues. Typically, chemical pathology laboratories are the largest sub-units in pathology departments and commonly perform measurements of many different chemicals on hundreds of patient samples each day. Because many of these analyses are time-critical, the chemical pathology laboratory is usually highly automated and uses complex analysers that are capable of performing many analyses in a short time frame. Chemical pathologists are responsible for running these laboratories, ensuring the quality of the results, and providing a diagnostic service and advice to clinicians. This requires a sophisticated knowledge of the pathophysiology of disease, the diagnostic value of individual tests, and also of the work of the laboratory. A significant part of the work of the chemical pathologist entails oral communication with clinical colleagues, and for this reason significant emphasis is put on oral communication skills both in training and in assessment.

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35 hours/week
average time worked
$153,795/year
average salary
5 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Chemical pathology
The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA)
   
Chemical pathology is the branch of pathology which deals with the diagnosis and management of disease by use of chemicals present in body fluids and tissues. Typically, chemical pathology laboratories are the largest sub-units in pathology departments and commonly perform measurements of many different chemicals on hundreds of patient samples each day. Because many of these analyses are time-critical, the chemical pathology laboratory is usually highly automated and uses complex analysers that are capable of performing many analyses in a short time frame. Chemical pathologists are responsible for running these laboratories, ensuring the quality of the results, and providing a diagnostic service and advice to clinicians. This requires a sophisticated knowledge of the pathophysiology of disease, the diagnostic value of individual tests, and also of the work of the laboratory. A significant part of the work of the chemical pathologist entails oral communication with clinical colleagues, and for this reason significant emphasis is put on oral communication skills both in training and in assessment.
https://www.rcpa.edu.au/Pathology-Careers/Becoming-A-Pathologist/Detailed-Information-About-Becoming-a-Pathologist/Curriculum
$1,144 plus $110 registration fee
35
32/68
2
5
Oversubscribed
26
N/A
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To gain FRCPA in chemical pathology requires five years of accredited training and satisfactory completion of the assessment program. No more than four years in the one institution will be allowed. RCPA trainees are required to have had at least one year of clinical work (i.e. have completed intern year), however candidates are encouraged to have two years of clinical practice.
Candidates are encouraged to have two years of postgraduate clinical practice, though one year is the minimum requirement.
The college accepts applications from registered medical practitioners with a minimum of one year's postgraduate experience who wish to become specialist pathologists. Applicants must be employed in an accredited laboratory before seeking registration with the college. Laboratories are accredited for training in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and Saudi Arabia. The college plays no part in placing applicants in employment. Pathology training takes a minimum of five years.
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$153,795
Basic Pathological Sciences examination: $670 ($140 if a current medical student)
Chemical Pathology Part I examination: $2340
Chemical Pathology Part II examination: $2340
Total $5,350
The program comprises:

• Clinical endocrinology: requirements include one core clinical year in endocrinology and metabolism plus specified additional clinical training in the laboratory years. Trainees are expected to acquire a depth and breadth of knowledge in clinical endocrinology and metabolism, including diabetes. They must develop a detailed understanding of the principles of endocrine physiology, biochemistry, and cellular and hormonal metabolism.

• Laboratory training in chemical pathology: requirements include three years of laboratory training with allowance being made for ongoing direct patient care during each year. Two years must include 80% of laboratory work and 20% of ongoing direct patient care. The third laboratory year should include ongoing direct patient care of at least 10% full-time equivalent. Training must be undertaken in laboratories accredited with the RCPA and is usually supervised by a Fellow of the RCPA.

• With prior approval by the CJCT the third laboratory year may be substantially altered to allow the commencement of a PhD or MD.
Annual registration for all trainees closes in February. Applications for examinations also close in February. Examinations are generally held in late May.
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