• Cardiothoracic surgery

Cardiothoracic surgery

Summary

specialty image

Cardiothoracic surgeons specialise in the treatment and management of diseases that occur in the organs inside the chest and in the bony structures and tissues that form the chest cavity. Coronary artery disease is one of the most common diseases treated by cardiothoracic surgeons. General thoracic surgeons primarily treat lung cancer and diseases of the esophagus and chest wall. Congenital heart surgeons care for babies and children with holes between the heart chambers or abnormal connections within the heart. Listed below are some examples of diseases treated by cardiothoracic surgeons.

• Coronary artery disease or blockages of the arteries in the heart
• Blockages in the heart valves
• Leaking heart valves
• Abnormal enlargement or aneurysms of the large arteries in the chest
• Heart failure
• Atrial fibrillation

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36 - 40 hours/week
average time worked
$138,096 - $553,736/year
average salary
6 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Cardiothoracic surgery
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS)
   
Cardiothoracic surgeons specialise in the treatment and management of diseases that occur in the organs inside the chest and in the bony structures and tissues that form the chest cavity. Coronary artery disease is one of the most common diseases treated by cardiothoracic surgeons. General thoracic surgeons primarily treat lung cancer and diseases of the esophagus and chest wall. Congenital heart surgeons care for babies and children with holes between the heart chambers or abnormal connections within the heart. Listed below are some examples of diseases treated by cardiothoracic surgeons.
• Coronary artery disease or blockages of the arteries in the heart
• Blockages in the heart valves
• Leaking heart valves
• Abnormal enlargement or aneurysms of the large arteries in the chest
• Heart failure
• Atrial fibrillation
http://www.surgeons.org/surgical-specialties/cardiothoracic/
$3,426 per training year
36 - 40
8/92
3
6
Oversubscribed
33
No
N/A
Trainees require two surgical terms in one of the nine surgical sub-specialties and one cardiothoracic surgery term of 10 weeks.
An online curriculum vitae (20%), structured referee reports (35%) and a semi-structured interview (45%) are also part of the selection process.
FRACS
The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) is responsible for training in nine surgical specialties via the Surgical Education and Training (SET) program. The following are courses expected to be completed during SET training. You may apply to these courses even before you are accepted onto the program:
• ASSET course — Australian and New Zealand Surgical Skills Education and Training
• CCrISP course — Care of the Critically Ill Surgical Patient
• EMST course — Early Management of Severe Trauma
• CLEAR course — Critical Literature Evaluation and Research

There are often long waiting lists to complete these courses (sometimes up to two years) and it's a good idea to apply early. There are overseas courses which can be substituted for some of these courses, and they often have shorter waiting times. Ensure the college will accept these overseas courses before you register. You can apply for the SET program in any of the nine specialties during PGY2, with the earliest successful entry at the beginning of PGY3. Many trainees do not get onto SET until PGY4 or 5 (this varies with the specialty). The first step in the application process for SET training is to register with the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS).
$138,096 - $553,736
Generic Surgical Science Examination fee - $3930
Clinical Examination fee - $2255
Cardiothoracic Surgical Sciences and Principles Examination Part 1 fee - $1490
Cardiothoracic Surgical Sciences and Principles Examination Part 2 fee- $2235
Fellowship Examination fee - $8165
$15,820
To become a surgeon, a doctor must first complete a medical degree and gain general medical registration in Australia or New Zealand. This usually involves one to two years working and training in a clinical setting, usually in a hospital. The earliest point at which application can be made for entry to the training program is during postgraduate year 2 (PGY2), when the intern process has been completed and general medical registration has been achieved. Successful applicants would commence training in postgraduate year 3 (PGY3). In practice, the ability to apply is not based on postgraduate year, but on having achieved the prerequisites set for the individual programs. If a doctor’s application to enter SET is successful, they will train in one of the nine surgical specialties under the auspices of RACS. This training occurs primarily in public hospitals and usually takes between four and seven years, depending on the specialty.

With the exception of clinical rotation assessments, all other training program requirements (examinations and skills courses) must be successfully completed in each year or level in the SET program. Failure to complete a requirement within the specified year or level may lead to the trainee not progressing in the SET program. Upon successful completion of SET, they then can become a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (FRACS) and will be accredited to practise independently as a consultant surgeon.
Applications open in January
2

NB: Salary figures, working hours, undersubscribed and oversubscribed can vary greatly depending on various factors including but not limited to geographic location, private or public practice. MedVersus provides an Australia wide overview. For information specific to your needs we encourage you to discuss further with the relevant colleges/associations. For feedback/information to keep the site up to date please contact us by email: media@gptq.qld.edu.au

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