• Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia

Summary

Anaesthesia refers to the practice of administering medications either by injection or by inhalation that block the feeling of pain and other sensations, or that produce a deep state of unconsciousness that eliminates all sensations, which allows medical and surgical procedures to be undertaken without causing undue distress or discomfort.
Relief of pain and suffering is central to the practice of anaesthesia. Specialist anaesthetists are fully qualified medical doctors who hold a degree in medicine and spend at least two years working in the hospital system before completing a further five years (or equivalent) of accredited training in anaesthesia culminating in being awarded a diploma of fellowship of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA), which can be recognised by the initials FANZCA after their name. General Practitioners (GP) are able to offer anaesthesia services in rural areas where there is no ongoing specialist cover available. It means that a general practitioner is able to offer this service to their community to avoid patients having to travel to larger regional centres to access surgery. GP anaesthesia training is administered by the Joint Consultative Committee on Anaesthesia (JCCA).

GPs can practice with a sub-specialty; this allows them to focus on a particular area of medical interest. See below for further information on the training requirements for a sub-specialty in Anaesthesia .

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36 hours/week
average time worked
$225,934/year
average salary
5 years
min full time
GP sub-specialty
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Anaesthesia
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA)
   
Relief of pain and suffering is central to the practice of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia refers to the practice of administering medications either by injection or by inhalation that block the feeling of pain and other sensations, or that produce a deep state of unconsciousness that eliminates all sensations, which allows medical and surgical procedures to be undertaken without causing undue distress or discomfort.  Specialist anaesthetists are fully qualified medical doctors who hold a degree in medicine and spend at least two years working in the hospital system before completing a further five years (or equivalent) of accredited training in anaesthesia culminating in being awarded a diploma of fellowship of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA), which can be recognised by the initials FANZCA after their name. General Practitioners (GP) are able to offer anaesthesia services in rural areas where there is no ongoing specialist cover available. It means that a general practitioner is able to offer this service to their community to avoid patients having to travel to larger regional centres to access surgery. GP anaesthesia training is administered by the Joint Consultative Committee on Anaesthesia (JCCA).
http://www.anzca.edu.au/
Application fee: $684 (one-off fee). Training registration fee: $2217 (one-off fee). Annual trainee fee: $2999
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General Practitioners (GP) are able to offer anaesthesia services in rural areas where there is no ongoing specialist cover available. It means that a general practitioner is able to offer this service to their community to avoid patients having to travel to larger regional centres to access surgery. GP anaesthesia training is administered by the Joint Consultative Committee on Anaesthesia (JCCA). This is a tripartite committee with representatives from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA), the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP- Rural) and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM). It sets the standards, monitors and examines GP registrars from the rural training stream of the RACGP and ACRRM who are completing a 12 month skills post in anaesthesia using the Curriculum Statement in Anaesthesia for advanced rural skills and advanced specialised training as the basis of the training. This training includes: • A twelve month training period in a JCCA-accredited post • A satisfactory report from the director of the training department. Registrars must produce this satisfactory report of training from their supervisor before they are permitted to sit for the examination. • Success in the JCCA examination. Upon successful completion of training, these GPs are considered suitable to offer services to patients in the ASA1-3 rating categories, with some in the ASA3 category after appropriate assessment.
Medically qualified practitioners wishing to train in the specialty of anaesthesia in Australia or New Zealand need to apply and register with the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The college provides a 260-week (five year) anaesthesia training program undertaken during supervised clinical placements within ANZCA-accredited departments and other training sites. Upon successful completion of the program, doctors are awarded Fellowship of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and will be qualified to practise as specialist anaesthetists in Australia and New Zealand, subject to the requirements of the Medical Board of Australia and the Medical Council of New Zealand respectively.
To apply, you need to be a registered medical practitioner and have completed one year's (full-time equivalent) prevocational medical education and training. In order to start the ANZCA training program, you need to have completed at least two years' prevocational medical education and training. These 104 weeks can include no more than 52 weeks' experience in any combination of clinical anaesthesia, intensive care medicine and pain medicine.
Applicants need to be registered medical practitioners and have completed one year's full-time prevocational medical education and training. Applicants need to complete the application/registration form and sign the application agreement.
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$225,934
Primary exam fee: $5,028. Final exam fee: $5,591.
$10,619
The ANZCA training program is divided into four periods:

- Introductory training. Trainees may complete this study unit in a minimum of 26 weeks (including a maximum of three weeks normal leave). This unit introduces the ANZCA Roles in Practice focusing on the development of basic knowledge and skills across the ANZCA Clinical Fundamentals and safe, patient-centred practice. The primary goal of introductory training is for trainees to be able to safely anaesthetise low-risk patients having low-risk surgery.

- Basic training. Trainees may complete this study unit in a minimum of 78 weeks (including a maximum of 16 weeks normal leave for introductory training and basic training). This unit further develops the ANZCA Roles in Practice, and trainees will also continue to expand and apply their knowledge of basic sciences, anatomy and equipment necessary to support safe practice across the ANZCA Clinical Fundamentals. The primary goal of basic training is for the trainee to be able to anaesthetise patients safely with distant supervision, where there is moderate complexity based on patient or surgical factors.

- Advanced training. Trainees may complete this study unit in a minimum of 104 weeks (including a maximum of 16 weeks normal leave). The primary goal of advanced training is for the trainee to safely anaesthetise ASA 1-4 patients having complex procedures with distant supervision. Progress in the clinical fundamentals - such that the trainee is able to assess and optimise patients with significant co-morbidities; manage perioperative crises, resuscitation and trauma; utilise advanced airway management techniques and ventilation strategies; manage complex acute pain; and perform challenging spinal, epidural and other regional blocks - supports this goal.

- Provisional fellowship training. Trainees may complete provisional fellowship training in a minimum of 52 weeks (including a maximum of eight weeks normal leave). During provisional fellowship training, Fellows will continue to develop across all ANZCA Roles in Practice, refining their capability to provide quality patient care. The primary goal of this training period is for trainees to demonstrate maturity in identifying and anticipating their learning needs and seeking appropriate opportunities to enhance their abilities, acknowledging their ongoing personal responsibility to maintain and improve their practice. Upon completion of this training period, trainees are expected to demonstrate efficient and effective work practice at a consultant level, exhibiting broader leadership skills and a commitment to upholding the ethical and professional standards of the specialty.
Application times vary. Contact the college for specific details.
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